Last edited by Taucage
Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Indian films in Soviet cinemas found in the catalog.

Indian films in Soviet cinemas

Sudha Rajagopalan

Indian films in Soviet cinemas

the culture of movie-going after Stalin

by Sudha Rajagopalan

  • 348 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Indiana Univ. Press in Bloomington, Indianapolis .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Motion pictures, Indic -- Soviet Union -- History,
  • Motion pictures -- India -- History,
  • Motion pictures -- Social aspects -- Soviet Union -- History

  • Edition Notes

    StatementSudha Rajagopalan.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPN1993.5.I8 R278 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 241 p. :
    Number of Pages241
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23725984M
    ISBN 100253353424, 0253220998
    ISBN 109780253353429, 9780253220998
    LC Control Number2009281158

    Book Description. This book presents a comprehensive re-examination of the cinemas of the Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe during the communist era. It argues that, since the end of communism in these countries, film scholars are able to view these cinemas in a different way, no longer bound by an outlook relying on binary Cold War. IUCAT is Indiana University's online library catalog, Encyclopaedia of Indian cinema / Ashish Rajadhyaksha, Paul Willemen. Format Book Edition New rev. ed. Indian films in Soviet cinemas: tthe culture of movie-going after Stalin. Rajagopalan, Sudha. PNI8 R35

      It wasn’t – it was actually in Kharkov, then the capital of Soviet Ukraine. This dreamlike, Chicago-via-Malevich structure is Gosprom, a governmental building designed by Serafimov, Felger and Kravets (–), and it is the only Soviet modernist building that regularly features in . The title of this chapter is important. India has many film industries making films in more than a dozen different languages. Unfortunately, outside India there is little sense of this diversity and it is often assumed that Indian cinema = Hindi cinema, aka 'Bollywood'. My aim therefore is to present some background on the other.

    The death of Stalin, and the ensuing cultural thaw instigated by Khrushchev, gave renewed impetus to Soviet filmmakers in the late s, and in the s the nation was witnessing something of a second cinematic golden age, with a new generation of directors taking inspiration less from their silent-era forefathers, and more from the “new wave” cinemas of France, Italy and Eastern : Daniel Fairfax. I saw my first three Tarkovsky films on release in UK cinemas, Solaris (), Andrei Rublev () and Mirror () and not only did I enjoy them but I found myself moved by them in different ways. When I watched Tarkovsky’s début film Ivan’s Childhood () some years later on .


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Indian films in Soviet cinemas by Sudha Rajagopalan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Indian films and film stars were immensely popular with Soviet audiences in the post-Stalinist period. Sudha Rajagopalan provides the first detailed social and cultural history of this phenomenon, exploring the consumption of Indian popular cinema in the USSR Cited by: Indian films and film stars were immensely popular with Soviet audiences in the post-Stalinist period.

Sudha Rajagopalan provides the first detailed social and cultural history of this phenomenon, exploring the consumption of Indian popular cinema in the USSR from the mids until the end of the Soviet era.

Drawing on oral history and archival research in Russia, Rajagopalan analyzes the. But ‘Awaara’ was the undisputed champion among Indian films.

Big B hopes for Bollywood’s comeback in Russia Coming a close second behind Awaara is ‘Bobby’, released in the Soviet Union Author: Natalia Fedotova. Bollywood films became available across the Soviet Union in the s as an alternative to western cinema.

Deepa Bhasthi looks back at the Hindi movies that. The cinema of the Soviet Union includes films produced by the constituent republics of the Soviet Union reflecting elements of their pre-Soviet culture, language and history, albeit they were all regulated by the central government in Moscow.

Most prolific in their republican films, after the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, were Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ukraine, and, to a. Get this from a library. Indian films in Soviet cinemas: the culture of movie-going after Stalin. [Sudha Rajagopalan].

10 rows  Highest-grossing foreign films. This is a list of foreign films that sold the most tickets at the. They “juxtaposed Indian films against Soviet monochrome; to these viewers Indian cinema represented novelty, celebration, glamour and at the same time, legitimised attention for personal emotions and individual pursuits and triumphs” (pp.

43–44).Author: Julie A. Cassiday. Folksonomy: A system of classification derived from the practice and method of collaboratively creating and managing tags to annotate and categorize content; this practice is also known as collaborative tagging, social classification, social indexing, and social tagging.

Coined by Thomas Vander. Indian Films in Soviet Cinemas: The Culture of Movie‐Going after Stalin. Sudha Rajagopalan.

Bloomington: Indiana University Press, pp. Between andeach of 50 Indian films drew in over 20 million viewers in the USSR. Four of these— Awara inBobby inBarood inand Disco Dancer in —crossed the 60 million mark, surpassing audiences.

Between andmore than Indian films were imported into the Soviet Union, in contrast to the 41 imported from the United States.

Disco Dancer (), a Bollywood film about a street performer gaining fame, fortune, and love by winning an International Disco Dancing Competition was the highest grossing film of the Soviet era.

About the Book: 'The Ultimate outcome of sociatism is melodrama so it is no wonder that Indian films became so popular in the Soviet Union after the Statin era that one could consider them a separate Soviet film genre.

This fascinating book offers not only an analysis of the dynamic of the film industry and consumption in the USSR but also shows deep understanding of Soviet sensitivity and. A History of Russian Cinema is the first complete history from the beginning of film to the present day and presents an engaging narrative of both the industry and its key films in Cited by: “The Cinema of the Soviet Thaw is an exciting contribution to the study of Soviet film, moving the field beyond institutional and historical questions.

Likewise, those concerned with the aesthetic, ideological, and other facets of postwar cinemas, should greet it enthusiastically.” — Film Quarterly. films set in the soviet union Download films set in the soviet union or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format.

Click Download or Read Online button to get films set in the soviet union book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want.

Indian films and film stars were immensely popular with Soviet audiences in the post-Stalinist period. Sudha Rajagopalan provides the first detailed social and cultural history of this phenomenon, exploring the consumption of Indian popular cinema in the USSR Author: Sudha Rajagopalan.

Music and dance are key features of Indian cinema. A devotion to family is a crucial element of the subject matter of the films. The budget for an Indian feature film is usually low cost compared to Hollywood, with estimates that a major Hindi film has a lower budget than that of a Hollywood trailer.

Hindi films are often set as escapist epics. Russian interest in Indian films is a fascinating subject of study. A couple great reads are the article "Soviet-Indian Coproductions: Alibaba as Political Allegory" by Masha Salazkina and the book "Indian Films in Soviet Cinemas: The Culture of Movie-Going After Stalin" by Sudha these sources I learned that Soviet-Indian cinematic ties began in the s and seem to have.

The first Indo-Soviet co-production Pardesi by was also made during the fifties. The transition to colour and the consequent preference for escapist entertainment and greater reliance on stars brought about a complete change in the film industry.

The sixties was a decade of mediocre films made mostly to please the distributors and to. The Soviet Union’s opposition to the West and rejection of its cultural production opened the door for Russia to develop what may seem like unlikely artistic allegiances. Thanks to a ban on Hollywood, Indian cinema crept into Soviet popular ces, sympathetic to India’s desire to escape colonial rule and struggles with partition, were bolstered by Bollywood’s refreshing brand Author: Zita Whalley.

Unlike Indian films, which were widely beloved in all parts of the USSR, Soviet films were just not popular in India. Indian movie theaters weren’t great at distributing Soviet movies, and when they did, they often screened them late at night when no one would even want to go see a movie.One Of The Projects To Commemorate Years Of Indian Cinema.

It Includes Several Unpublished Pictures Both On Screen And Off Screen. The Book Will Enable The Reader To Glide Through A Voyage That Will Bring Home The Expanse And Variety Of Indian Cinema At A Glance.

Profusely Illustrated. BOOK EXCERPT ‘In our grey lives, we happened into a fantasy world’: Why the Soviet Union fell for Indian cinema As dubbed Russian films make their way to local cinemas, a Author: Sudha Rajagopalan.